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Who Hasn’t Played Croquet?

Modern Croquet has its origins in Ireland and arrived in England in the 1850s.  The field can be as big or as small as the size of your lawn.  See the drawing for wicket and stake placement.  The object is to get all your colored balls through all the wickets to the stake.  Almost every major sporting goods or department store offers this affordable way to enjoy your yard.

The directions north, south, east and west do not necessarily refer to geographic directions.  The southwest corner of the croquet court is defined as the corner where the first wicket and starting area are located.  The other directions follow from this definition.

Tips:

  • Orient the court north to south if possible to avoid having the sun in your eyes while playing.
  • All wickets are oriented east to west according to the directional conventions described above.
  • For beginning play or play in long grass, a smaller court (40-by-50-foot) is recommended.  To set up: follow the directions above, except replace “21″ with “10″ and “42″ with “20″ in the steps below.
  1. Lay out your playing field.  (A regulation croquet court is 84 feet wide by 105 feet long.)
  2. Use a mallet to drive a stake into the exact center of the court.
  3. Place a wicket 21 feet from the south end of the court so that its center is 21 feet from the west end of the court.
  4. Set another wicket 21 feet from the south end of the court so that its center is 21 feet from the east end of the court.
  5. Place two more wickets 21 feet from the north end of the court and 21 feet from either side as described above.
  6. Set a fifth wicket 21 feet south of the stake so that its center is 42 feet from the west end of the court.
  7. Place a sixth wicket 21 feet north of the stake so that its center is 42 feet from the west end of the court.
  8. Attach all four ball clips to the top of the first wicket (in the southwest corner).

To learn more visit the United States Croquet Association: http://www.croquetamerica.com/

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